Posts

Video: Owning Our History: The New Zealand Wars

Image
Owning Our History: The New Zealand Wars webinar was held on 22 March 2020.


Kaikōrero / Speakers: Joanna Kidman and Vincent O'Malley
Ringa hāpai / Chair: Susan Healy

Watch the video (58:42) here.




When Ōtorohanga College pupils petitioned Parliament in 2015, calling for a national day of commemoration for the New Zealand Wars, they sparked a vital debate about memory, identity and history.

How do New Zealanders remember and forget difficult events in our colonial past? Why are some conflicts publicly remembered while others are forgotten or overlooked? And who decides?

Now that New Zealand history will be taught in all schools from 2022, these questions become vitally important.

We argue that iwi and hapū need to be at the forefront of conversations around this new curriculum and that connecting with mana whenua histories will empower rangatahi to better understand the places they call home.



To watch other webinars from the Te Tiriti-Based Futures + Anti-Racism 2020 webina…

New Zealand Wars Teaching and Learning Resources

Image
Over the past year I have given a number of talks and presentations on the New Zealand Wars to a variety of audiences.

I have provided links to a few of these presentations that are available online here for anyone wanting to learn more about these defining conflicts.

My books, The New Zealand Wars/Ngā Pakanga o Aotearoa and The Great War for New Zealand: Waikato 1800-2000, are also both available to purchase as e-books during the current lock-down, either directly from publisher Bridget Williams Books or from the usual online e-book outlets.




Many New Zealand libraries will also provide access to these works through the various Bridget Williams Books digital collections. Check the eLibrary section of your local library.

Michael King Memorial Lecture, May 2019

The New Zealand Wars/Ngā Pakanga o Aotearoa was launched at the Auckland Writers Festival in May 2019, where I was honoured to be invited to deliver the prestigious Michael King Memorial Lecture before a very large audience.

Click h…

Webinar: Owning Our History: The New Zealand Wars

Image
Kaikōrero / Speakers: Joanna Kidman and Vincent O'Malley
Ringa hāpai / Chair: Susan Healy

When Ōtorohanga College pupils petitioned Parliament in 2015, calling for a national day of commemoration for the New Zealand Wars, they sparked a vital debate about memory, identity and history.

How do New Zealanders remember and forget difficult events in our colonial past? Why are some conflicts publicly remembered while others are forgotten or overlooked? And who decides?
Now that New Zealand history will be taught in all schools from 2022, these questions become vitally important.

We argue that iwi and hapū need to be at the forefront of conversations around this new curriculum and that connecting with mana whenua histories will empower rangatahi to better understand the places they call home.



Starts on: Sunday, 22 March 2020 at 12:00 PM NZDT Ends on: Sunday, 22 March 2020 at 1:00 PM NZDT  To register for this free webinar, part of the Te Tiriti-Based Futures + Anti-Racism …

National Portrait

Image
The following extract comes from a portrait written by Philip Matthews and published by Stuff in May 2019.


xxxxxxxxxxx
New Zealand is slowly emerging from its amnesia about the 19th-century New Zealand Wars – we used to call them the Māori Wars or the Land Wars – and O'Malley is at least partially responsible for that.


His monumental 2016 book about the 1863-64 war in Waikato, The Great War for New Zealand, has now been followed by a smaller, more accessible, illustrated account, The New Zealand Wars Ngā Pakanga o Aotearoa. Ever wondered about the wars and why they happened? This is the ideal place to start. 


Essentially, the New Zealand Wars stretched across nearly 30 years, from 1845 to 1872, ranging from the Bay of Islands in the north to Wairau, near Blenheim, in the south, with a lot of action in Waikato and Taranaki. Some individual stories are better known than others: the messianic defiance of Te Kooti and Titokowaru​, Hone Heke and his repeated sabotage of British …

NZ Wars: Stories of Waitara

Image
Produced by Great Southern Television for RNZ, Stories of Waitara was released on the Rā Maumahara marked on the 28th October this year at Ōwae Marae in Taranaki.

Created and presented by Mihingarangi Forbes, it follows on from the award-winning Stories of Ruapekapekaand tells the stories of the first Taranaki War of 1860-61, drawing on Te Ātiawa tribal historians and experts and with input from me.






It also features a series of extended interviews and other clips. Here is the full sit-down interview with me.



And some further scenes visiting various monuments and memorials connected with the wars and reflecting on what they tell us about how this history has been remembered within Taranaki.

Teaching New Zealand History

Image
The Education Gazette asked me to comment on the recent announcement that New Zealand history will soon be taught in all schools.

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

The announcement that New Zealand’s histories will be taught in all schools by 2022 is a crucial step in ensuring future generations leave school with at least some level of understanding of our nation’s past – including “the good, the bad, and the ugly”, as Rahui Papa of Waikato-Tainui said at the time.

But it also opens up important discussions around what exactly should be taught and how.

For me, a vital first principle is that iwi and hapū are at the forefront of those conversations.

Connecting with mana whenua history will empower rangatahi to better understand the places they call home.



Begin close to home

Students should be encouraged to engage with the histories of their own communities, but without forgetting the wider context.

Rangatahi in the Gisborne district, for example, should learn about the 1865 siege of Waere…

The New Zealand Wars: Vincent O'Malley in discussion with Mihingarangi Forbes

Image
The New Zealand Wars were a series of conflicts fought between the Crown and various Maori groups between 1845 and 1872. Profoundly shaping the course and direction of our nation's history, the wars have been neglected, misrepresented and have had little hold on the popular imagination.
 Today, however, interest in the wars is reviving, in part due to books like The New Zealand Wars | Ngā Pakanga o Aotearoa published earlier this year by Bridget Williams Books. Mihingarangi Forbes interviews the historian Vincent O'Malley about the stories of wartime in front of an audience at Te Papa.To listen to the full conversation, click here.